Scientists have identified a possible crater left by the biggest space impact in modern times – the Tunguska event.
The blast levelled more than 2,000 sq km of forest near the Tunguska River in Siberia on 30 June 1908.
A comet or asteroid is thought to have exploded in the Earth’s atmosphere with a force equal to 1,000 Hiroshima bombs.
Now, a University of Bologna team says a lake near the epicentre of the blast may be occupying a crater hollowed out by a chunk of rock that hit the ground.
Lake Cheko – though shallow – fits the proportions of a small, bowl-shaped impact crater, say the Italy-based scientists.
Their investigation of the lake bottom’s geology reveals a funnel-like shape not seen in neighbouring lakes.

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